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Computer Science

The Computer Science curriculum at CFGS aims to equip students to use computational thinking and creativity to understand and change the world around them. It ensures that pupils become digitally literate – able to use, and express themselves and develop their ideas through, information and communication technology – at a level suitable for the future workplace and as active participants in a digital world. Students are taught various principles of computer science to develop their logical ability by means of algorithms, flowcharts, and so on.  They understand the internal organisation and workings of a computer system along with the latest programming languages (both text and graphic based).  Students also learn ICT skills along with ways to stay safe online.

Computer Science Key Stage 3 assessment guide HERE

KEY STAGE 3 CURRICULUM

year 7

TERM AND COURSE TITLE

DESCRIPTION OF UNIT

Autumn Term: Programming Language – Basic

 

Use a textual programming language to solve a variety of computational problems.

Make appropriate use of data structures (e.g. lists, tables or arrays) using “JustBasic” programming language.

Spring Term:  E-Safety and Cybercrime

Understand a range of ways to use technology safely, respectfully, responsibly and securely, including protecting their online identity and privacy. 

Recognise inappropriate content, contact and conduct and know how to report concerns.

Summer Term: Computing in Real Life

 

Design, use and evaluate computational abstractions that model the state and behaviour of real world problems and physical systems.

Create, re-use, revise and re-purpose digital artefacts for a given audience, with attention to trustworthiness, design and usability.

year 8

TERM AND COURSE TITLE

DESCRIPTION OF UNIT

Autumn Term: How do computers understand me?

 

 

 

Understand how numbers can be represented in binary and be able to carry out simple operations on binary numbers (e.g. binary addition and conversion between binary and decimal). Understand simple Boolean logic (AND, OR and NOT) and some of its uses in circuits and programming.

Understand how instructions are stored and executed within a computer system. Understand how data of various types (including text, sound and pictures) can be represented and manipulated digitally, in the form of binary digits.

Spring Term: Creative Project – Project Development Life Cycle

 

 

Understand the hardware and software components that make up a computer system.

Undertake creative project that involves selecting, using, and combining multiple applications, preferably across a range of devices to achieve challenging goals including meeting the needs of known users.

Summer Term: Creative Project – Collecting and Analysing Data

Undertake creative project that involves selecting, using, and combining multiple applications, preferably across a range of devices to achieve challenging goals including collecting and analysing data and meeting the needs of known users.

year 9

TERM AND COURSE TITLE

DESCRIPTION OF UNIT

Autumn Term: Computational Thinking

Understand several key algorithms that reflect computational thinking (e.g. ones for sorting and searching).

 

Use Logical reasoning to compare the utility of alternative algorithms for the same problem.

Spring Term: Programming Language – Python

Use a textual programming language to solve a variety of computational problems – Python.

 

Make appropriate use of data structures (e.g. lists, tables or arrays) – Python. Design and develop modular programs that use procedures or functions.

Summer Term: We are Connected

Understand the hardware and software components that make up a computer system.

Understand how various components communicate with one another and with other systems.

 

KEY STAGE 4 CURRICULUM

At CFGS, students in Year 10 and 11 can choose Computer Science as an optional subject. They study GCSE (9-1) OCR - Computer Science. It consists of 3 units.

Unit 1: Computer systems

• Systems Architecture

• Memory

• Storage

• Wired and wireless networks

• Network topologies, protocols and layers

• System security

• System software

• Ethical, legal, cultural and environmental concerns

Written paper

80 marks

1 hour and 30 minutes

 

 

40% of total GCSE

 

Unit 2: Computational thinking, algorithms and programming

• Algorithms

• Programming techniques

• Producing robust programs

• Computational logic

• Translators and facilities of languages

• Data representation

Written paper

80 marks

1 hour and 30 minutes

 

 

40% of total GCSE

Unit 3: Programming project

• Programming techniques

• Analysis

• Design

• Development

• Testing and evaluation and conclusions

Non-Exam Assessment (NEA)

40 marks

Totalling 20 hours

 

20% of total GCSE

 

KEY STAGE 5 CURRICULUM

Students follow a vocational pathway. They complete the Cambridge Technology Level 2 qualification which is assessed through a combination of internal and external moderation of course work and written assessment.  In this qualification, students are provided with opportunities to visit ICT firms to expand their knowledge and understanding of how such organisations function and the role of women in the growing computing industry.

Students complete 4 units, 2 of which are exams.

 

Who’s in the team?

  • Ms Kaur - Head of Computing
  • Ms Miah
  • Ms Khatun