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25-33 Bow Road, London, E3 2AE0208 981 1131

Computer Science

The Computer Science department at Central Foundation Girls’ School aims to equip students with the skills to participate in a rapidly-changing world through challenging and engaging topics. 

Students will develop an understanding and application in the fundamental principles of computer science by having the opportunity to write programs, design databases, develop networks and produce professional digital products.  Students will become digitally literate – able to use, and express themselves and develop their ideas through, information and communication technology – at a level suitable for the future workplace and as active participants in a digital world.

Computing skills are a major factor in enabling children to be confident, creative and independent learners and it is our intention that children have every opportunity available to allow them to achieve this.

The national curriculum for computing aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • can understand and apply the fundamental principles and concepts of computer science, including abstraction, logic, algorithms and data representation
  • can analyse problems in computational terms, and have repeated practical experience of writing computer programs in order to solve such problems
  • can evaluate and apply information technology, including new or unfamiliar technologies, analytically to solve problems
  • are responsible, competent, confident and creative users of information and communication technology.

In Computer Science we are dedicated to ensuring our students leave with the skills to fully embrace a future of rapidly advancing computer technology.

KEY STAGE 3 CURRICULUM

At KS3, we follow the National Curriculum document to deliver knowledge and content over 3 units in each year group.  In KS3, we expect students:

  • To be able to design, use and evaluate computational abstractions that model the state and behaviour of real-world problems and physical systems
  • To be able to understand key algorithms that reflect computational thinking e.g. linear and binary searching, bubble sort, merge sort, insertion sort and use logical reasoning to compare the utility of alternative algorithms for the same problem.
  • To be able to program in a minimum of two programming languages to solve a variety of computational problems.
  • To have an understanding simple Boolean logic [AND, OR and NOT] and some of its uses in circuits and programming. To understand how numbers can be represented in binary, and be able to carry out simple operations on binary numbers.
  • To understand the hardware and software components that make up computer systems, and how they communicate with one another and with other systems
  • Understand how instructions are stored and executed within a computer system.  To have an understanding how data of various types (including text, sounds and pictures) can be represented and manipulated digitally, in the form of binary digits.
  • To be complete projects using and combining multiple applications, across a range of devices, to achieve challenging goals, including collecting and analysing data and meeting the needs of known users.
  • To be able to create, reuse, revise and repurpose digital artefacts for a given audience, with attention to trustworthiness, design and usability
  • To be able to understand a range of ways to use technology safely, respectfully, responsibly and securely, including protecting their online identity and privacy; recognise inappropriate content, contact and conduct, and know how to report concerns.

YEAR 7

TERM AND COURSE TITLE

DESCRIPTION OF UNIT

Autumn Term: Living in the Digital World

 

Understand a range of ways to use technology safely, respectfully, responsibly and securely, including protecting their online identity and privacy

Understand a range of ways to use technology safely, respectfully, responsibly and securely, including protecting their online identity and privacy

Spring Term:  Programming Language - Basic

Use a textual programming language to solve a variety of computational problems – Basic

Make appropriate use of data structures (e.g. lists, tables or arrays) - Basic

Summer Term: Computing in Real Life

 

Design, use and evaluate computational abstractions that model the state and behaviour of real world problems and physical systems.

Create, re-use, revise and re-purpose digital artefacts for a given audience, with attention to trustworthiness, design and usability.

 

YEAR 8

TERM AND COURSE TITLE

DESCRIPTION OF UNIT

Autumn Term: Creative Project - Project Development Life Cycle

 

 

 

Understand the hardware and software components that make up a computer system.

Undertake creative project that involves selecting, using, and combining multiple applications, preferably across a range of devices to achieve challenging goals including meeting the needs of known users.

Spring Term: How do computers understand me?

 

 

Understand how numbers can be represented in binary and be able to carry out simple operations on binary numbers (e.g. binary addition and conversion between binary and decimal). Understand simple Boolean logic (AND, OR and NOT) and some of its uses in circuits and programming

Understand how instructions are stored and executed within a computer system. Understand how data of various types (including text, sound and pictures) can be represented and manipulated digitally, in the form of binary digits

Summer Term: Creative Project – Collecting and Analysing Data

Undertake creative project that involves selecting, using, and combining multiple applications, preferably across a range of devices to achieve challenging goals including collecting and analysing data and meeting the needs of known users.

 

YEAR 9

TERM AND COURSE TITLE

DESCRIPTION OF UNIT

Autumn Term: Programming Language - Python

Understand several key algorithms that reflect computational thinking (e.g. ones for sorting and searching) Use Logical reasoning to compare the utility of alternative algorithms for the same problem.

Use a textual programming language to solve a variety of computational problems – Python.

Make appropriate use of data structures (e.g. lists, tables or arrays) – Python. Design and develop modular programs that use procedures or functions.

Spring Term: We are Connected

Understand the hardware and software components that make up a computer system.

Understand how various components communicate with one another and with other systems.

Understand how to make Internet Secure – Cyber Safety, Cryptography.

Summer Term: Computing Projects

Understand Health and Safety laws related with Computing.

Understand various future technologies and their impact on us.

Duke of York Bronze award

ENRICHMENT OPPORTUNITIES AT KEY STAGE 3

Various Coding workshops including:

  • Lego Mindstorms Robotics Club
  • Vodafone Digital Leaders Challenge
  • Cyber Discovery Challenge

Various Trips to Computing organisations including:

  • Barclay Card
  • Colt

Students participate in various UK wide competitions including:

  • Bebras Challenge
  • Hour of Code
  • Duke of York award
  • Robotics Challenge
  • App Development Challenge

KEY STAGE 4 CURRICULUM

At KS4, we follow the National Curriculum document to deliver knowledge and content using the OCR GCSE (9-1) Computer Science specification.  In KS4, we expect students:

  • To be able to understand and apply the fundamental principles and concepts of Computer Science, including abstraction, decomposition, logic, algorithms, and data representation.
  • To be able analyse problems in computational terms through practical experience of solving such problems, including designing, writing and debugging programs
  • To be able to think creatively, innovatively, analytically, logically and critically.
  • To understand the components that make up digital systems, and how they communicate with one another and with other systems.
  • To be able to understand the impacts of digital technology to the individual and to wider society
  • To have the ability to apply mathematical skills relevant to Computer Science.  Students must be able to calculate using multiplication to a high level without a calculator.

YEAR 10 

AUTUMN AND SPRING TERMS

Theory Paper 1: Computer systems

Systems Architecture - How a computer processes data in the form of Von Neumann Architecture.

Memory - The different types of memory – RAM, ROM, Virtual Memory & Flash

Storage - The typical storage devices used by computers – Optical, Magnetic and Solid State.

Wired and wireless networks - How data is transferred across networks and the components which make up these networks.

Network topologies, protocols and layers - The two main network topologies, protocols in networking and the different layers of sending data over a network.

System security - Common types of attacks/viruses and prevention methods.

System software - Common built in software used to enhance the performance of the computer system.

Ethical, legal, cultural and environmental concerns - Ongoing issues regarding computer systems in the world.​​​​​​​

YEAR 10

SPRING AND SUMMER TERMS

Programming Project/Theory Paper 2 - Computational Thinking, Algorithms and Programming 

Programming project is a practical project used to enhance skills for paper 2.  Although completed on the computer it needs to be done as an independent report and requires students to develop their programing skills outside of the classroom as well as within.

The areas covered are:

• Programming techniques

• Analysis

• Design

• Development

• Testing and evaluation and conclusions

 

Part of programming project is completed in year 10 and rest in year 11. Whilst completing programming project, following will be covered from paper 2:

• Programming techniques - Understand the three main programming concepts – Iteration, Selection and Sequence, as well as SQL, Data Types

YEAR 11

AUTUMN, SPRING AND SUMMER TERMS

Programming Project/Theory Paper 2- Computational Thinking, Algorithms and Programming

Programming project is a practical project used to enhance skills for paper 2.  Although completed on the computer it needs to be done as an independent report and requires students to develop their programing skills outside of the classroom as well as within.

The areas covered are:

• Programming techniques

• Analysis

• Design

• Development

• Testing and evaluation and conclusions

YEAR 11

AUTUMN, SPRING AND SUMMER TERMS

 

Whilst completing programming project, following will be covered from paper 2:

·  Algorithms  - To be able to write and recognise both searching and sorting algorithms including Bubble Sort, , Merge Sort, Insertion Sort, Linear Search and Binary Search

• Producing robust programs – To be able to write programs in pseudocode to solve problems.  This will include having an understanding of systems life cycle and each element involved in it.

• Computational logic – Students will know how to calculate Truth Tables from the three main logic gates, AND, OR, NOT

• Translators and facilities of languages – Students will be able to identify and understand the difference between Low and High Level Programming.

• Data representation – Students will be able to complete mathematical calculations in Binary, Hexadecimal and will be able to calculate file sizes of images and sound files using formulae. ​​​​​​​

 

EXAM BOARD AND WEIGHTINGS (INCLUDE NEA DETAILS IF APPLICABLE)

Exam Board: OCR

Weightings:

  • Paper 1 – Computer Systems (50%)
  • Paper 2 – Computational Thinking, Algorithms and Programming (50%)
  • Programming Project – Students follow the SDLC to complete a 20 hour programming Project

 

ENRICHMENT OPPORTUNITIES AT KEYSTAGE 4

Various Coding workshops including:

  • Lego Mindstorms Robotics Club
  • Vodafone Digital Leaders Challenge
  • Cyber Discovery Challenge

Various Trips to Computing organisations including:

  • Morgan Stanley offices
  • Queen Mary University

Students participate in various UK wide competitions including:

  • Bebras Challenge
  • Hour of Code

KEY STAGE 5 CURRICULUM

At KS5, we offer 2 qualifications: OCR Cambridge Tech Level 2 and OCR A-Level Computer Science specification.

At this stage, in addition to all the skills and knowledge developed at KS3 and KS4, students will be able to have an in depth understanding of underlying principles of Computer Science to be able to see and appreciate relationships between different aspects of computer science. Students will also develop the ability to articulate the individual (moral), social (ethical), legal and cultural opportunities and risks of digital technology.

OCR Cambridge Tech Level 2 is a 1 year course which provides students with a grade equivalent to GCSE.

OCR A-Level Computer Science is taught as a 2 year linear course where papers are sat at the end of year 13.

YEAR 12

LEVEL 2 IT

AUTUMN TERM

Unit 1 – Essentials of IT

  • Know about hardware components
  • Know about software components
  • Know how to install and upgrade hardware and software
  • Know about the use of the World Wide Web (WWW)
  • Know about the benefits of using IT in business

 

Unit 2 – Essentials of cyber security

  • Know about aspects of cyber security
  • Understand the threats and vulnerabilities that can result in cyber security attacks
  • Understand how organisations/individuals can minimise impacts from cyber security incidents

 

Students sit 2 formal exams in January on these 2 units.

EXAM BOARD AND WEIGHTINGS (INCLUDE NEA DETAILS IF APPLICABLE)

OCR.

4 units: Unit 1, 2 and 17 are compulsory units and Unit 8 is optional. Unit 1 and 17 are double the weighting of unit 2 and 8.

YEAR 12

LEVEL 2 IT

SPRING AND SUMMER TERMS

Unit 8 – Using Emerging technologies

  • Know about technologies that are currently emerging
  • Be able to explore how emerging technologies can support business needs
  • Be able to reflect on future impacts of emerging technologies

Unit 17 – Using data analysis software

  • Understand the data used by business
  • Be able to select software to analyse data for business purposes
  • Be able to use software to analyse data for business purposes
  • Be able to present the results of data analysis to the client

These are coursework units that are externally moderated in May/June based on availability of moderator.

ENRICHMENT OPPORTUNITIES AT KEY STAGE 5 

As part of the course, students complete 1 week of work experience placement in an IT based organisation.

YEAR 12

A LEVEL COMPUTER SCIENCE

AUTUMN AND SPRING TERMS

Comp 1 – Computer Systems

The characteristics of contemporary processors, input, output and storage devices – What are the components of a computer and their uses

Software and software development – What are the types of software and the different methodologies used to develop software

Exchanging data – How data is exchanged between different systems

Data types, data structures and algorithms – How data is represented and stored within different structures. Different algorithms that can be applied to these structures

Legal, moral, cultural and ethical issues – What are the individual moral, social, ethical and cultural opportunities and risks of digital technology. Understanding legislation surrounding the use of computers and ethical issues that can or may in the future arise from the use of computers. 

YEAR 12

A LEVEL COMPUTER SCIENCE

SUMMER TERM

Comp 3 – Programming Project

It consists of following sections:

  • Analysis of the problem
  • Design of the solution
  • Developing the solution
  • Evaluation

Part of the project is covered in year 12 and the rest is completed in year 13. Whilst working on the programming project, following will be covered from comp 2:

Problem solving and programming – How computers can be used to solve problems and programs can be written to solve them

 

YEAR 13

A LEVEL COMPUTER SCIENCE

AUTUMN AND SPRING TERMS

 

Comp 2 – Algorithms and programming

Elements of computational thinking – Understand what is meant by computational thinking

Problem solving and programming – How computers can be used to solve problems and programs can be written to solve them

Algorithms – Understand the use of algorithms to describe problems and standard algorithms​​​​​​​

 

EXAM BOARD AND WEIGHTING (INCLUDE NEA DETAILS IF APPLICABLE)

OCR.

3 units:

  • Comp 1: Computer Systems (Written Paper – 40%)
  • Comp 2: Algorithms and programming (Written Paper – 40%)
  • Comp 3: Programming Project (NEA – 20%)

 

ENRICHMENT OPPORTUNITIES AT KEY STAGE 5 

As part of the course, students complete 1 week of work experience placement in an IT based organisation.

Various Trips to Computing organisations including:

  • Morgan Stanley offices
  • Queen Mary University

Students participate in various UK wide competitions including:

  • Bebras Challenge
  • Hour of Code
  • Raspberry Pi Competition

Students also attend various other enrichment events including:

  • The Royal Institute’s Christmas Lectures
  • Revision Workshops

WHO’S IN THE TEAM?

Faculty email address: Computing@central.towerhamlets.sch.uk

Faculty staff members:

Ms. K.  Kaur,  Head of Faculty
Ms. L. Coakley, Teacher of Computing/Deputy Headteacher 
Ms. A. Khatun, Teacher of Computing
Ms. L. Miah, Teacher of Computing
Ms. R. Shah, Teacher of Computing