Skip to content ↓

25-33 Bow Road, London, E3 2AE0208 981 1131

Geography

 
 
In Geography, our intent is for the curriculum to promote curiosity and a thirst for knowledge about the world around us. Our curriculum will enable our students to develop a skill set which will allow them to become confident learners and ask questions about the world around them.  The intent is to develop a holistic approach to learning at Key Stage three, four and five which will give students a foundation to build on for their next stage. Our students will develop skills inside and outside the classroom through a series of fieldwork activities and visits to broaden their knowledge, understanding and skill set. The three aspects of students’ achievements in geography are:
  • Contextual world knowledge of locations, places and geographical features.
  • Understanding of the conditions processes and interactions that explain features and distributions, patterns and changes over time and space.
  • Competence in geographical enquiry the application of skills in observing collecting, analysing, mapping and communicating geographical.

Our students will show progression in Geography through the following criteria:

  • Demonstrating greater fluency with world knowledge by drawing on increasing breadth and depth of content and contexts.
  • Extending from the familiar and concrete to the unfamiliar and abstract.
  • Making greater sense of the world by organising and connecting information and ideas about people, places, processes and environments.
  • Working with more complex information about the world, including the relevance of people’s attitudes, values and beliefs.
  • Appreciate the differences and similarities between people’s views of the world, its environments, societies and cultures.
  • Increasing the range and accuracy of investigative skills, and advancing their ability to select and apply these with increasing independence to geographical enquiry.

Through the programme outline above our students will develop essential tools for learning which can be applied across subjects and in the wider world. Students will be inspired to continue the study of Geography at KS4 and Post 16 and learners will ‘think like a geographer’.

Implementation of Curriculum 

Geography is introduced to our students at primary school as an enquiry based project, cross curricular or through sessions taught within Humanities. At CFGS we have the task of taking their foundation geographical skills, knowledge and developing more developed skill set which allows them to gain a wider and deeper knowledge and understanding about the world around us. We implement this through engaging lessons, well developed resources, effective teaching strategies which are accessible to all. Our SOW reflect a variety of topics with a balance between physical, human and environmental geography. Our topics have been developed to inspire students, hold their interest and develop in them a love for learning. Our SOW develop their geographical skills and knowledge and enables them to ‘think like a geographer’. We do this though a number of skills which include; investigative, cartographic, numeracy, statistical, data analysis, literacy and decision making skills.

Our assessments have taken into account the range of skills, knowledge and understanding needed to make progression. By identify key areas and applying different assessment objectives and weightings to each of the key areas across key stages. Thus ensuring a range of key skills, knowledge and understanding are covered and assessed to prepare a student for the challenges of KS4 and KS5.  In this way different rates of progression through each skill set can be recognised and responded to as outlined in the Geography Curriculum map for KS3 and the SOW for KS4 and KS5. 

The geographical S/K/U have been mapped across the key stage three and across the different units of work at KS4 and KS5.  Assessment is built into the existing schemes of work, tasks are worked towards in lessons and then produced independently, or in groups, as a consequence of the learning that has taken place.  A range of activities will be used to assess geographical S/K/U development in order to ensure all learning styles are catered for. 

Impact of Curriculum

In Geography the curriculum will make a profound, positive impact to the outcomes of every student. It will give our students a skill set which allows them to become confident and inquisitive learners. Our curriculum is quality assured through qualitative and quantitative measures such as:

  • Attainment data
  • Observing lessons
  • Dynamic planning
  • Work reviews
  • Student voice
  • Student data for KS4/5
  • Student options at KS4 and KS5
  • Attendance data
  • Behaviour data

KEYSTAGE 3

Progression Map 

  YEAR 7 YEAR 8 YEAR 9
Contextual world knowledge of locations, places and geographical features

Developing and extensive framework knowledge of the world, including globally significant physical and human features and places in the news.

 

Recognise, describe and appreciate importance of wider geographical location (physical and human features) in understanding places.

 

Knowledge and understanding of aspects of the geography of the UK and wider world.

Using knowledge and understanding to describe & begin to analyse physical and human characteristics in range of locations, contexts & scales.

 

Understand that places and people can be affected by actions and events in other places e.g. globalisation leading to production of cheaper materials in the developed world.

Many factors, including people’s values and attitudes influence decisions made about places.

Understand the concept of sustainable development.

Have extensive knowledge relating to a wide range of places, environments and features at a variety of appropriate spatial scales, extending from local to

global.

Have knowledge of different environments and climates and their impact on people.

 

 

 

 

Understand how consideration of sustainable development can affect people’s lives as well as the planning and management of environments & resources. Understanding the pros and cons of resource extraction.

Understanding processes and interactions that explain features, distributions patterns and changes over time.

Understand in some detail what a number of places are like, how and why they are similar and different,

and how and why they are changing.

 

They know about some spatial patterns in physical and human geography, the conditions which influence those patterns, and the processes which lead to change. They show some understanding of the links between

places, people and environments.

 

 

Understanding the implications of wealth on quality of life in differing geographical locations.

Recognise different groups of people have differing opinions.

Recognise and describe simple geographical patterns.

Understand and develop an explanation how physical and human processes interact and understand that issues such as sustainable development are complex.

 

Describe different how conflict can occur and that people sometimes have different perspectives on how to use the environment.

 

Understanding the role of different institutions (IMF and World Bank) in HICs and LICs in managing development.

Knowledge and understanding of the barriers LICs encounter on the road to development.

Critical thinking skills. Analyse different options and reach conclusions that fit the evidence.

Understand and explain the physical and human conditions and processes which lead to the development of, and change in, a variety of geographical features, systems and places.

 

Can explain various ways in which places are linked and the impact such links have on people and environments. Understanding different approaches to development (top down and bottom up intermediate technology).

 

Understand the complex nature of the development gap and assess why certain countries face barriers to development (social, economic, political and environmental).

Understand alternative approaches to development & implications for quality of life in different places.

 

Make connections between different geographical phenomena they have studied. Assess the merits of different views concerning human and environmental issues and justify views
Geographical enquiry and the application of skills in observing, collecting, analysing, evaluating (GIS) and communicating information.

Be able to carry out investigations using a range of geographical questions, skills and sources of information including a variety of maps, graphs and images.

 

Can express and explain their opinions and recognise why others may have different points of view. Awareness that different places have both similar and different characteristic.

 

Use more advanced map skills such as 6 figure grid references and contours to identify and describe places and you can draw labelled sketch maps.

Make use of ICT to research a topic e.g. search the Internet.

Can carry out a range of fieldwork techniques e.g. sketching and making simple maps. Use of GIS to apply and enhance these skills.

Be able to use a wide range of map skills, including digital maps to describe and explain places and geographical patterns e.g. migration.

 

Can demonstrate decision-making skills, including using GIS.

 

Can carry out fieldwork accurately using a range of equipment and data aids. Use of GIS to develop knowledge and understanding of patterns and trends in data. Applying data/information to maps and diagrams.

Be able, with increasing independence, to choose and use a wide range of data to help investigate, interpret, make judgements, analyse and draw conclusions about geographical questions, issues and problems, and express and engage with different points of view about these.

 

Use of GIS to enhance knowledge and understanding. Interpreting maps and data to recognise complex patterns and trends. Relationships between different sets of data.

 

Applying complex data and information to maps and diagrams to aid understanding and application if GIS skills.

 

Keystage 3 Overview and Assessment 

TERM & THEME YEAR 7 

Autumn Term 1 & 2

  Introduction to Geography & Extreme Environments

  • Introduction to Geography: Students look at the individual strands of human and physical geography, and begin to make links between them (environmental geography). Understand the big picture.
  • Extreme Environments: Be able to explain how different types of fauna and flora survive in polar and hot desert environments. To know the global distribution of ice and identify the places where most glaciers are found.

    Develop an awareness that human-induced climate change now threatens the long-term survival of glaciers everywhere.

    Understand how processes shape glacial landforms and appreciate the differences between weathering, erosion and deposition.

    Recognise that what happens to glaciers in the future could have an impact on their own homes as a consequence of sea-level rise.

  • Assessment on Extreme Environment

National Curriculum links: 

  • Locational knowledge: extend their locational knowledge and deepen their spatial awareness of the world’s countries using maps of the world to focus on Africa, focusing on their environmental regions, including polar and hot deserts, key physical and human characteristics.
  • Place Knowledgeunderstand geographical similarities, differences and links between places through the study of human and physical geography of a region within Africa.
  • Human and physical geographyunderstand how human and physical processes interact to influence, and change landscapes, environments and the climate; and how human activity relies on effective functioning of natural systems, glaciation
  • Geographical skills and fieldworkbuild on their knowledge of globes, maps and atlases and apply and develop this knowledge routinely in the classroom and in the field.
  • topographical and other thematic mapping, and aerial and satellite photographs.

Spring Term 1&2

Map Skills & Carbon Footprints

  • Map Skills: Be able to read compass directions, understand and use scale, map symbols. To be able to use four and six figure grid references. To be able to read height on an OS map using layer colouring, spot heights and contour lines.  To identify different types of land use on an OS map and through fieldwork. To be able to identify spatial patterns in physical and human geography, the conditions which influence those patterns, and the processes which lead to change. They show some understanding of the links between places, people and environments.

  • Assessment on Map Skills

National Curriculum links: 

  • Locational knowledge: extend their locational knowledge and deepen their spatial awareness of the world’s countries using maps of the world, key physical and human characteristics, countries and major cities. 
  • Geographical skills and fieldwork: build on their knowledge of globes, maps and atlases and apply and develop this knowledge routinely in the classroom and in the field
  • interpret Ordnance Survey maps in the                 classroom and the field, including using grid references and scale, topographical and other thematic mapping, and aerial and satellite photographs
  • use Geographical Information Systems (GIS) to view, analyse and interpret places and data
  • use fieldwork in contrasting locations to collect, analyse and draw conclusions from geographical data, using multiple sources of increasingly complex information.

Summer Term 1

Carbon Footprints

  • Carbon footprints: Identify the greatest contributor to a carbon footprint.

    Comparing the carbon footprint of different countries. Explain why carbon footprints differ.

    Understand the causes of global warming. Identify the different types of pollution.

    Use GIS to analyse car emissions. Compare emissions across London.

    Investigate the impacts of climate change using a case study. Describe ways people can reduce their carbon footprints.

    To explain the advantages and disadvantages of renewable and non-renewable energy resources

  • Assessment on Carbon Footprints 

National Curriculum links: 

  • Locational knowledge : extend their locational knowledge and deepen their spatial awareness of the world’s countries using maps of the world to focus on Africa, Russia, Asia (including China and India), and the Middle East. 

  • Place Knowledge: understand geographical similarities, differences and links between places. 

  • Human and physical geography:  understand, through the use of detailed place-based exemplars at a variety of scales, the key processes in:

  • human geography relating to: population and urbanisation; international development; economic activity in the primary, secondary, tertiary and quaternary sectors; and the use of natural resources

    understand how human and physical processes interact to influence, and change landscapes, environments and the climate; and how human activity relies on effective functioning of natural systems

  • Geographical skills and fieldwork: use Geographical Information Systems (GIS) to view, analyse and interpret places and data

Summer Term 2

School Environment

What is my school environment like?

To be able to carry out a school project on improving the school environment. Which will include:

  • An introduction
  • A methodology
  • Data presentation
  • Data analysis
  • Conclusion
  • Evaluation

 

  • Assessed project 

National Curriculum links: 

  • Place Knowledge: understand geographical similarities, differences and links between places
  • Human and physical geography: understand how human and physical processes interact to influence, and change landscapes, environments and the climate; and how human activity relies on effective functioning of natural systems
  • Geographical skills and fieldworkbuild on their knowledge of globes, maps and atlases and apply and develop this knowledge routinely in the classroom and in the field
  • interpret Ordnance Survey maps in the classroom and the field, including using grid references and scale, topographical and other thematic mapping, and aerial and satellite photographs
  • use fieldwork in contrasting locations to collect, analyse and draw conclusions from geographical data, using multiple sources of increasingly complex information.

 

 

TERM & THEME YEAR 8 

Autumn Term 1 & 2

Tectonic Hazards

T1A: Earthquakes

T1B: Volcanoes

  • Define a hazard is and classify.
  • Identify and describe the different layers of the Earth.
  • Recognise that the Earth's crust is made up of tectonic plates.
  • Describe and explain the distribution of earthquakes and volcanoes.
  • Describe and explain different plate boundaries.
  • Examine the effects of and responses to two different earthquakes in a developing and developed country.
  • Different types of volcanoes and their impacts.
  • Prediction and preparations – How to reduce damage from earthquakes and volcanoes.
  • Assessment on Hazards 

National Curriculum links: 

  • Locational knowledge: extend their locational knowledge and deepen their spatial awareness of the world’s countries using maps of the world
  • Human and physical geography: understand, through the use of detailed place-based exemplars at a variety of scales, the key processes in physical geography relating to: geological timescales and plate tectonics
  • Geographical skills and fieldworkbuild on their knowledge of globes, maps and atlases and apply and develop this knowledge routinely in the classroom
  • use Geographical Information Systems (GIS) to view, analyse and interpret places and data

Spring Term 1 

Super Power Geography 

Russia

  • Russia’s climate; Chernobyl accident; Russia’s natural resources and impact on the environment; Sustainable development.

  • Assessment on Russia and natural resources

National Curriculum links: 

  • Locational knowledge: extend their locational knowledge and deepen their spatial awareness of the world’s countries using maps of the world to focus on, Russia, (including China and India).
  • Place Knowledgeunderstand geographical similarities, differences and links between places through the study of human and physical geography of a region within Asia
  • Human and physical geography: understand, through the use of detailed place-based exemplars at a variety of scales, the key processes in:
  • human geography relating to: population and urbanisation; international development; economic activity in the primary, secondary, tertiary and quaternary sectors; and the use of natural resources

  • understand how human and physical processes interact to influence, and change landscapes, environments and the climate; and how human activity relies on effective functioning of natural systems

  • Geographical skills and fieldworkbuild on their knowledge of globes, maps and atlases and apply and develop this knowledge routinely in the classroom

  • interpret Ordnance Survey maps in the classroom and the field, including using grid references and scale, topographical and other thematic mapping, and aerial and satellite photographs

Spring Term 2

Trade and Development 

India and China

  • Development Indicators; Employment structures; Differences in quality of life; Examining uneven development; China and sustainable development; Investigating multinationals; Understanding fair trade.
  • Assessed world trade activity 

National Curriculum links: 

  • Locational knowledge: extend their locational knowledge and deepen their spatial awareness of the world’s countries using maps of the world to focus on, Russia, (including China and India).
  • Place Knowledgeunderstand geographical similarities, differences and links between places through the study of human and physical geography of a region within Asia
  • Human and physical geography: understand, through the use of detailed place-based exemplars at a variety of scales, the key processes in: human geography relating to: population and urbanisation; international development; economic activity in the primary, secondary, tertiary and quaternary sectors
  • Geographical skills and fieldworkbuild on their knowledge of globes, maps and atlases and apply and develop this knowledge routinely in the classroom
  • interpret Ordnance Survey maps in the classroom and the field, including using grid references and scale, topographical and other thematic mapping, and aerial and satellite photographs

Summer Term 1
  • Weathering and Rivers

Summer Term 2

Coasts

  • Erosion and coastal defences

 

TERM & THEME YEAR 9 

Autumn Term 1

Brazil 

  • The Amazon Soil Erosion Sustainable Development

Autumn Term 2 

Population 

  • DTM
  • HICs and LICs

Spring Term 1 & 2

Sustainable Cities

  • Mega Cities
  • London & Curitiba Brazil

Summer Term 1 & 2

Extreme Weather 

  • Global circulation system
  • Hurricanes 
  • Climate futures
  • UK and Bangladesh 

 

 

KEYSTAGE 4

The aims and objectives of the KS4 course is to enable students to build on their Key Stage 3 knowledge and skills to:

  • Develop and extend their knowledge of locations, places, environments and processes, and of different scales, including global; and of social, political and cultural contexts (know geographical material)
  • Gain understanding of the interactions between people and environments, change in places and processes over space and time, and the interrelationship between geographical phenomena at different scales and in different contexts (think like a geographer)
  • Develop and extend their competence in a range of skills, including those used in fieldwork, in using maps and Geographical Information Systems (GIS) and in researching secondary evidence, including digital sources; and develop their competence in applying sound enquiry and investigative approaches to questions and hypotheses (study like a geographer)
  • Apply geographical knowledge, understanding, skills and approaches appropriately and creatively to real-world contexts, including fieldwork, and to contemporary situations and issues; and develop well-evidenced arguments, drawing on their geographical knowledge and understanding (applying geography).

Geographical Skills: Students develop a range of geographical skills, including mathematics and statistics skills, throughout their course of study. These skills are assessed across a number of GCSE units of work.

TERM & THEME YEAR 10

Autumn Term 1

Development Dynamics

  • EQ1: What is the scale of global inequality and how can it be reduced?
  • EQ2: How is ONE of the world’s emerging countries managing to develop?

Autumn Term 2 

The UK's evolving human landscape

  • EQ1: Why are places and people changing in the UK?
  • EQ2: How is ONE major UK city changing?

Spring Term 1

The UK's evolving human landscape

  • Geographical investigations: Fieldwork and research on Investigating dynamic urban areas
  • Stratford Quality of Life Fieldwork 

Spring Term 2

The UK's evolving physical landscape

  • EQ1: Why does the physical landscape of the UK vary from place to place?
  • EQ2: Why is there a variety of distinctive coastal landscapes in the UK and what are the processes that shape them?
  • EQ3: What are the challenges for coastal landscapes and communities and why is there conflict about how to manage them?

Summer Term 1

The UK's evolving physical landscape

  • EQ4: Why is there a variety of river landscapes in the UK and what are the processes that shape them?
  • EQ5: What are the challenges for river landscapes, people and property and how can they be managed?
  • Geographical investigations: Fieldwork and research on Investigating river processes and pressures.

  • Rivers and Flood Risk Fieldwork 

  • Year10 Trial Exam

Summer Term 2

Challenges of an urbanising world

  • EQ1: What are the causes and challenges of rapid urban change?
  • EQ2: Why does quality of life vary so much within ONE megacity in a developing country OR emerging country?

 

TERM & THEME YEAR 11

Autumn Term 1

Challenges of an urbanising world

&

Hazardous Earth

  • EQ1: How does the world’s climate system function, why does it change and how can this be hazardous for people?
  • EQ2: How are extreme weather events increasing hazardous for people?
  • EQ3: Why do the causes and impacts of tectonic activity and management of tectonic hazards vary with location?

Hazardous Earth

&

People and the biosphere

  • EQ: Why is the biosphere so important to human wellbeing and how do humans use and modify it to obtain resources?
  • Yr11 Trial Exam 

Forests under threat

  • EQ: What are the threats to forest biomes and how can they be reduced?

Consuming energy resources

  • EQ: How can the growing demand for energy be met without serious environmental consequences?
  • Paper 3 Trial Exam 
Revision 
  • External Exams
Revision 
  • External Exams

EXAM BOARD AND WEIGHTINGS 

Exdexcel  B Geography 

Papers 1 and 2 Examination (37.5% each unit)

The examination papers for these units are resource based and require knowledge recall and explanations. You will have maps, photographs and diagrams to help you answer some of the questions. Questions will range from short questions up extended writing questions. These papers are based on content in Unit 1 and Unit 2 only.

You will be required to carry out two separate fieldwork activities for which you will need to answer exam questions in Unit 2.

Paper 3 Examination (25%)

Making Geographical Decisions, is a decision-making exercise based on a resource booklet given in the examination.  It will consist of a colour resource booklet on a geographical issue or location. Questions will assess your understanding of the resources in relation to environmental issues and sustainability.

Fieldwork Opportunities 

As part of the preparation for Unit 2 exam students carry out physical and human geography fieldwork. This will be based on key enquiry questions from the specification notes below.

Investigating river processes and pressures

Investigating how and why drainage basin and channel characteristics influence flood risk for people and property along a river in the UK.

Investigating dynamic urban areas

Investigate how and why quality of life varies within urban areas.

ENRICHMENT OPPORTUNITIES AT KEYSTAGE 4 

Edexcel B KS4 

Edexcel Pearson GCSEs Geography B (9-1) from 2016

SENECA Geography Edexcel B GCSE

BBC Bitesize Geography 

 

KEYSTAGE 5

Edexcel A Level Geography

The aims and objectives of the A level course is to enable students to build on their KS4 knowledge and skills to:

  • Develop knowledge of locations, places, processes and environments, at all geographical scales from local to global
  • Recognise and be able to analyse the complexity of people–environment interactions at all geographical scales
  • Develop understanding of, and ability to apply, the concepts of place, space, scale and environment, that underpin both the national curriculum and GCSE
  • Gain understanding of specialised concepts which include the concepts of causality, systems, equilibrium, feedback, inequality, representation, identity, globalisation, interdependence, mitigation and adaptation, sustainability, risk, resilience and thresholds
  • Improve understanding of the ways in which values, attitudes and circumstances have an impact on the relationships between people, place and environment, and develop the knowledge and ability to engage, as citizens, with the questions and issues arising
  • Become confident and competent in selecting, using and evaluating a range of quantitative and qualitative skills and approaches
  • Understand the fundamental role of fieldwork as a tool to understand and generate new knowledge about the real world, and become skilled at planning, undertaking and evaluating fieldwork in appropriate situations
  • Apply geographical knowledge, understanding, skills and approaches in a rigorous way to a range of geographical questions and issues, including those identified in fieldwork, recognising both the contributions and limitations of geography
  • Develop as critical and reflective learners, able to articulate opinions, suggest relevant new ideas and provide evidenced argument in a range of situations
  • Develop a deep understanding of both physical and human processes
  • Build on and reinforce conceptual understanding underpinning GCSE
  • Show a considerable degree of independence in selecting and using a wide range of geographical methods, techniques and skills, involving both qualitative and quantitative methods
  • Undertake fieldwork that encourages them to apply and evaluate theory in the real world, and that A Level fieldwork in particular demands a high degree of responsibility from students for selecting research questions, applying relevant techniques and skills, and identifying appropriate ways of analysing and communicating findings.

Geographical Skills:

This specification requires students to:

  • Understand the nature and use of different types of geographical information, including qualitative and quantitative, primary and secondary, images, factual text and discursive/creative material, digital data, numerical and spatial data and innovative forms of data, including crowd-sourced and 'big data' and including dot maps, kite diagrams, linear and logarithmic scales, dispersion diagrams, aerial, oblique, ground, satellite images, GIS
  • Collect, analyse and interpret such information, and demonstrate the ability to understand and apply suitable analytical approaches for the different information types including, qualitative approaches such as coding and sampling and quantitative approaches such as measures of dispersion, measures of correlation and association from the following statistical tests: t-tests, Spearman’s rank, Chi-squared, Gini Co-efficient, Lorenz curve
  • Undertake informed and critical questioning of data sources, analytical methodologies, data reporting and presentation, including the ability to identify sources of error in data and to identify the misuse of data
  • Communicate and evaluate findings, draw well-evidenced conclusions informed by wider theory, and construct extended written argument about geographical matters.

Fieldwork

A Level students must complete a minimum of four days of fieldwork. Fieldwork must be carried out in relation to processes in physical and human geography. This is a Department for Education (DfE) requirement.

In the non-examination assessment component, students are required to undertake an independent investigation that involves (but need not be restricted to) fieldwork, producing a written report. Students’ investigations will incorporate fieldwork data (collected individually or as part of a group).

Full details of the required fieldwork skills are provided in Appendix 2: Fieldwork skills.

 

 

TERM & THEME YEAR 12

Autumn Term 1 & 2

Globalisation 

 

 

 

 

Tectonic Process and Hazards

  • EQ1: What are the causes of globalisation and why has it accelerated in recent decades?
  • EQ2: What are the impacts of globalisation for countries, different groups of people and cultures?
  • EQ3: What are the consequences of globalisation for global development and how should different players respond to its challenges?

 

  • EQ1: Why are some locations more at risk from tectonic hazards?
  • EQ2: Why do some tectonic hazards develop into disasters?
  • EQ3: How successful is the management of tectonic hazards and disasters?

Spring Term 1 & 2 

Regeneration 

 

 

Coastal Landscapes and Change 

  • EQ1: How and why do places vary?
  • EQ2: Why might regeneration be needed?
  • EQ3: How is regeneration managed?
  • EQ4: How successful is regeneration?

 

  • EQ1: Why are coastal landscapes different and what processes cause these differences?
  • EQ2: How do characteristic coastal landforms contribute to coastal landscapes?
  • EQ3: How do coastal erosion and sea level change alter the physical characteristics of coastlines and increase risks?
  • EQ4: How can coastlines be managed to meet the needs of all players?
Summer Term 1 & 2 
  • Revision
  • Internal Exams
  • NEA preparation: NEA 20% of the overall of the A level
  • Y12 Residential Fieldtrip: Regeneration and Coastal Fieldwork

 

TERM & THEME YEAR 13 

Autumn Term 1 & 2

Superpowers 

 

 

 

 

The Water Cycle and Water Insecurity 

  • EQ1: What are superpowers and how have they changed over time?
  • EQ2: What are the impacts of superpowers on the global economy, political systems and the environment?
  • EQ3: What spheres of influence are contested by superpowers and what are the implications of this?

 

  • EQ1: What are the processes operating within the hydrological cycle from global to local scale?
  • EQ2: What factors influence the hydrological system over short- and long-term timescales?
  • EQ3: How does water insecurity occur and why is it becoming such a global issue for the 21st century?

Spring Term 1 & 2

Migration  Identity and Sovereignty

 

 

 

 

The Carbon Cycle and Energy Security 

  • EQ1: What are the impacts of globalisation on international migration?
  • EQ2: How are nation states defined and how have they evolved in a globalising world?
  • EQ3: What are the impacts of global organisations on managing global issues and conflicts?
  • EQ4: What are the threats to national sovereignty in a more globalised world?

 

  • EQ1: How does the carbon cycle operate to maintain planetary health?
  • EQ2: What are the consequences for people and the environment of our increasing demand for energy?
  • EQ3: How are the carbon and water cycles linked to the global climate system?
Summer Term 1 & 2 
  • Revision 
  • External Exams 

 

EXAM BOARD AND WEIGHTINGS

  • Paper 1: Assessed by an external exam, 2 hour and 15 minutes long worth 30%
  • Paper 2: Assessed by an external exam, 2 hour and 15 minutes long worth 30%
  • Paper 3: Assessed by an external exam, 2 hour and 15 minutes long worth 20%
  • NEA: Independent investigation worth 20%

NEA: In the non-examination assessment component, students are required to undertake an independent investigation that involves fieldwork, producing a written report. Students’ investigations will incorporate fieldwork data (collected individually or as part of a group). The independent study is 20% of the overall A level grade.

 

 

 

 

WHO'S IN THE TEAM?

Geography is taught by specialists all with Geography degrees. Their enthusiasm for the subject is evident.

Please contact us at Geography@central.towerhamlets.sch.uk

Ms. R. Begum, Teacher of Geography/Student Council Co-ordinator

Ms. H. McKenzie, Teacher of Geography

Ms. H. Houghton, Teacher of Geography 

Ms. R. Rehman, Second in Charge of Humanities