Skip to content ↓

25-33 Bow Road, London, E3 2AE0208 981 1131

History

The History department at CFGS are committed to the value of History in wider society. We seek to equip our students with the skills to process, analyse and evaluate arguments and debates.
 
 
We believe that studying History helps pupils to understand the complexity of people’s lives individual life’s as well as the multi-faceted nature of the modern world. We aim for our students to become curious historical thinkers and for them to be inspired by the past. We want to give them the skills to explore their own heritage and identities though historical study so that they feel a sense of ownership with the history they encounter.

At CFGS we are dedicated to providing a History curriculum that is representative and inclusive. We seek to do this by delivering a curriculum that is:

*Diverse: Our curriculum reflects our geographical position in London and in the borough of Tower Hamlets. East London has a uniquely rich history of diversity and students have the opportunity to make connections between local, regional, national and international history. We also seek to support the inclusion of women’s history in the curriculum so students can understand the contribution of both leading and lesser known female historical figures.

*Relevant: We have ensured that our curriculum is relevant to the modern world, equipping our students with critical thinking skills to navigate areas of life such as social media, fake news and other issues in contemporary society. We want to prepare our students for further historical study by providing students with aspiration ideas of where their historical learning can take them.

*Local: We want to utilise our unique location in the East End of London and teach engaging historical enquiries that draw on the rich history of the local area. Where possible we interweave a local dimension into our delivery of the history curriculum at all key stages.

 

KEYSTAGE  3 

The History department at CFGS follows the purpose of study set out in the National Curriculum for History 2014.

A high-quality history education will help pupils gain a coherent knowledge and understanding of Britain’s past and that of the wider world. It should inspire pupils’ curiosity to know more about the past. Teaching should equip pupils to ask perceptive questions, think critically, weigh evidence, sift arguments, and develop perspective and judgement. History helps pupils to understand the complexity of people’s lives, the process of change, the diversity of societies and relationships between different groups, as well as their own identity and the challenges of their time.

The skills that students learn at KS2 such as chronology, change, continuity, cause and consequences as well as using historical evidence are developed at KS3. The key proscribed areas under the National Curriculum are as follows:

* The development of Church, state and society in Medieval Britain 1066-1509

*The development of Church, state and society in Britain 1509-1745

*Ideas, political power, industry and empire: Britain, 1745-1901

*Challenges for Britain, Europe and the wider world 1901 to the present day

*The Holocaust

 *A local history study

At CFGS we cover aspects of all of these areas using a mixture of depth and overview study though interesting and original enquiry questions. We ensure that each historical skill is taught and tested in each year thus providing progression for students as they work though the KS3 curriculum. We have linked our assessment objectives and marking schemes to the GCSE EDEXCEL course that we teach at KS4 to help provide students with a smooth transition into KS4.

The skills that we assess are;

AO1: Historical Knowledge

AO2: Second Order Concepts (change, continuity, cause, consequence)

AO3: Using evidence

AO4: Assessing historical interpretations

TERM & THEME                                                            YEAR 7 

Autumn Term

Theme in British history that consolidates and extends pupils' chronological knowledge from before 1066

Development of Church, state and Society in Medieval Britain 1066 – 1509

  • Migration though time

    EQ - Why is East London a ‘melting pot’ of people? AO1 AO2 AO3

    Assessment - Baseline test

  • The Norman Conquest Political Change

    EQ –Was Simon Schama right about how the Normans changed England after 1066? AO2

    Assessment: Essay

Spring Term

Development of Church, state and Society in Medieval Britain 1066 – 1509

 

  • Medieval Life

    EQ –Why did rats cause the peasants to revolt in 1381? AO1 AO2

    Assessment: Essay

  • Islamic Civilisations

    Why were the early middle ages known as a ‘golden age’ for Islam? AO1 AO3

    Assessment: Analysing evidence

Summer Term

Significant society or issue in world history and its interconnections with other world developments

  • Islamic Civilisations

    Why were the early middle ages known as a ‘golden age’ for Islam? AO1 AO3

    Assessment: Analysing evidence

  • African Civilisations

    Was Hegel wrong to call Africa the ‘dark continent’? AO1 AO2

    Assessment: End of year test

 

TERM & THEME                                                       YEAR 8 

Autumn Term

Development of Church, state and society in Britain 1509 – 1745

  • Religious Change

    EQ –Why was Tudor rule a religious roller coaster?  AO1 AO2

    Assessment: Essay

  • Political Change

    EQ – Why did Parliament execute their King? 8 Lessons AO1 AO2

    Assessment: Essay

Spring Term

Ideas, political power, industry and empire: Britain, 1745-1901

  • Empire

    EQ – How did Britain gain an empire ‘where the sun never set’? AO1 AO3

    Assessment: Analysing evidence
  • Industrial Revolution

    EQ –How did the industrial revolution change Britain? AO1 AO2

    Assessment: Essay

Summer Term

Ideas, political power, industry and empire: Britain, 1745-1901

  • Slavery

    EQ – How did sugar corrupt British society in the 19th Century? AO1 AO4

    Assessment: Essay

    EQ – Does William Wilberforce deserve all the credit for the abolition of the Slave Trade and Slavery? AO1 AO4

    Assessment: End of year test

 

TERM & THEME                                                              YEAR 9

Autumn Term

Challenges for Britain, Europe and the wider world 1901 to the present day

  • World War One

    EQ –What caused war to break out in 1914? AO1 AO2

    Assessment: Essay

  • Suffragettes

    EQ – How did ludicrous little women’ become feminist heroes?

    Assessment: Comparing interpretations

Spring Term

Challenges for Britain, Europe and the wider world 1901 to the present day

 

  • World War Two

    EQ – Why did German bombs fall on the East End during World War Two?

    Assessment: Essay
  • The Holocaust

    EQ – How did Nazi persecution of Jews in Germany lead to genocide 1933 – 1945? AO1 AO2

    Assessment: Essay

Summer Term

Challenges for Britain, Europe and the wider world 1901 to the present day

 

  • Civil rights

    EQ - Does Martin Luther King deserve all the credit for gaining civil rights for African Americans in the 1960s? AO1 AO3

    Assessment: End of year test

 

ENRICHMENT OPPORTUNITIES AT KEYSTAGE 3

The department organises events in school. For example visits from Holocaust survivors and a Black History Month performance. The department has run trips to the Wallace collection and local museums in London. The department also provides special extracurricular sessions throughout the year for special events such as Black History Month, Armistice Day, Holocaust memorial day and International Women’s Day.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/subjects/zk26n39

KEYSTAGE 4

The History Department at CFGS follows the EDEXCEL 1-9 GCSE history specification. Its aims and objectives are as follows;

 

● develop and extend their knowledge and understanding of specified key events, periods and societies in local, British, and wider world history; and of the wide diversity of human experience

● engage in historical enquiry to develop as independent learners and as critical and reflective thinkers

● develop the ability to ask relevant questions about the past, to investigate issues critically and to make valid historical claims by using a range of sources in their historical context

● develop an awareness of why people, events and developments have been accorded historical significance and how and why different interpretations have been constructed about them

● organise and communicate their historical knowledge and understanding in different ways and reach substantiated conclusions. Summary of Department for Education content requirements

 

This GCSE complies with the requirements specified by the Department for Education (DfE) in its document History GCSE subject content (published April 2014). This requires students to study, as a minimum:

 

● Two depth studies, each covering a substantial and short time span:  At CFGS student’s study Weimar and Nazi Germany 1918 – 1939 and Early Elizabethan England 1558 - 1588

● a period study of at least 50 years: At CFGS student’s study the Superpower Relations 1943 - 1991

● the historic environment through the study of a particular site in its historical context: At CFGS student’s study Whitechapel, crime, policing and the inner city. 1870 - 1900

● a thematic study involving the study of people, events and developments over time. At CFGS student’s study Crime and Punishment 1000 – present

The DfE also requires that British history must form at least 40% of the assessed content.

 

TERM & ASSESSMENT YEAR 10 YEAR 11
Autumn Term 1

Paper 1:

Crime and Punishment 1000 – present

Assessment: Exam questions

Paper 2: Superpower Relations 1943 – 1991

 

Assessment: Mock exam on Crime and Punishment

Exam questions
Autumn Term 2

Paper 1: Crime and Punishment 1000 – present

 

Assessment: Exam questions

Paper 2: Superpower Relations 1943 – 1991

 

Assessment: Mock exam on Superpower relations

Exam questions
Spring Term 1

Paper 1: Whitechapel, crime, policing and the inner city. 1870 – 1900

Assessment: Exam questions and mock exam

Paper 2: Early Elizabethan England 1558 – 1588

Assessment: Mock exam on Germany

Exam questions
Spring Term 2

Paper 3: Weimar and Nazi Germany 1918 – 1939

 

Assessment: Exam questions

Paper 2: Early Elizabethan England 1558 – 1588

Assessment: Mock exam on Elizabethan England

Exam questions
Summer Term 1

Paper 3: Weimar and Nazi Germany 1918 – 1939

 

Assessment: Exam questions
Revision
Summer Term 2

Paper 3: Weimar and Nazi Germany 1918 – 1939

 

Assessment: Exam questions and mock exam
 

 

EXAM BOARD AND WEIGHTINGS (include NEA details if applicable)

Paper 1: Thematic study and historic environment (Paper codes: 1HI0/10–12)

Written examination: 1 hour and 15 minutes

30%* of the qualification

52 marks (16 for the historic environment, 36 for the thematic study)

 

Paper 2: Period study and British depth study (Paper codes: 1HI0/20–29)

Written examination: 1 hour and 45 minutes

40%* of the qualification

64 marks (32 for the period study and 32 for the British depth study)

 

Paper 3: Modern depth study (Paper codes: 1HI0/30–33)

Written examination: 1 hour and 20 minutes

30%* of the qualification

52 marks

 

ENRICHMENT OPPORTUNITIES AT KEYSTAGE 4

Guest speakers, visits to museum of London

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/subjects/zj26n39

KEYSTAGE 5

The department follows the AQA A-Level specification: The course is made up to two components and one NEA unit.

 

Component 1: Breadth study

Each Breadth study requires the study of an extended period and enables students to develop secure understanding of the process of change over time.

Each Breadth study is introduced by six key questions which identify issues and perspectives which are central to the period of study. They emphasise that the study of breadth requires students to develop an understanding of:

•• the nature of causes and consequences, of change and continuity and of similarity and differences over a long period of time

•• the links between perspectives, such as political, economic, social or religious as well as appreciating developments relating to the perspectives separately over time

•• the role played by individuals, groups, ideas or ideology.

The content for each period of study is set out in chronological sections. An examination question may arise from one or more of these sections of specified content. There is an important interrelationship between the six key questions and the specified content. Study of the content enables students to develop a secure understanding and knowledge of the period. The key questions inform and guide how the content should be studied. This combination of historical content, informed by key questions, seeks to combine ‘periods or themes’ in a manner which is manageable and historically valid. Thus,

‘Understanding of the process of change over time’ stems from secure knowledge of shorter periods which enable the development of a broader understanding as the study progresses.

Component 2: Depth study

Each Depth study is focused on a significant period of historical change or development. Students will gain deep understanding of change and continuity through the study of the interrelationships of a variety of perspectives as indicated in the content. They will develop detailed knowledge and understanding of developments and the roles of individuals, groups, ideas and ideology. Depth studies also promote an understanding of the complexity of the historical process through a detailed focus on a specific period of change.

Content is presented chronologically in sections as is most appropriate to the period of study. An examination question may arise from one, or more than one, section of specified content. To demonstrate depth of historical knowledge and understanding, students should be able to make links and comparisons between the aspects of the period studied. Therefore it is important that specified content should be studied both in its own right and holistically. In this way links and contrasts will be rooted in secure knowledge and understanding. Each of the Depth studies has an introductory commentary, setting out the focus of the study and the key concepts that apply to it. There is a close interrelationship between the commentary and the content that follows which enables students to appreciate the focus of the depth study.

 

Component 3: Historical investigation NEA

Students may study a specific issue or development in depth, but this must be placed in the context of approximately 100 years, or a broader theme and/or development. Issues which relate to international, national or local developments are appropriate, as are investigations which adopt specific historical perspectives such as cultural, social or technological. Through undertaking the Historical investigation, students will develop an enhanced understanding of the nature and purpose of history as a discipline and how historians work. They will broaden their study of the past whilst having the opportunity to study a specific issue in great depth.

 

TERM AND ASSESSMENT  YEAR 12 YEAR 13

Autumn Term 1

Paper 1 (1J)

The British Empire

1857-1967

 

Paper 2 (2O)

Democracy and Nazism in Germany 1918 - 1945

 

  • The development of Imperialism 1857-1890

 

 

  • The establishment and early years of the Weimar Republic 1918-24

 

  • Imperialism challenged

 

 

  • The Nazi Dictatorship  1933-39

Autumn Term 2

Paper 1 (1J)

The British Empire

1857-1967

 

Paper 2 (2O)

Democracy and Nazism in Germany 1918 - 1945

 

  • The development of Imperialism 1857-1890

 

 

  • The establishment and early years of the Weimar Republic 1918-24
  • The Golden Age of the Weimar Republic 1924-28

 

  • Imperialism challenged

 

 

  • The Nazi Dictatorship  1933-39
  • The Racial State 1933-41

Spring Term  1

Paper 1 (1J)

The British Empire

1857-1967

 

Paper 2 (2O)

Democracy and Nazism in Germany 1918 - 1945

 

  • Imperial consolidation and Liberal rule 1890-1914

 

 

  • The Golden Age of the Weimar Republic 1924-28
  • The collapse of democracy 1928-1933

 

  • The Racial State 1933-41
  • The impact of war 1939-45

Spring Term  2

Paper 1 (1J)

The British Empire

1857-1967

 

Paper 2 (2O)

Democracy and Nazism in Germany 1918 - 1945

 

  • Imperial consolidation and Liberal rule 1890-1914

 

 

  • The collapse of democracy 1928-1933

 

  • The impact of war 1939-45

Summer Term 1

Paper 1 (1J)

The British Empire

1857-1967

 

Paper 2 (2O)

Democracy and Nazism in Germany 1918 - 1945

 

  • NEA

    The making of the USA 1760 - 1865

 

  • NEA

    The making of the USA 1760 - 1865

 

  • Revision

Summer Term 2

Paper 1 (1J)

The British Empire

1857-1967

 

Paper 2 (2O)

Democracy and Nazism in Germany 1918 - 1945

 

  • NEA

    The making of the USA 1760 - 1865

 

 

  • NEA

    The making of the USA 1760 - 1865
 

 

EXAM BOARD AND WEIGHTINGS (include NEA details if applicable)

AQA A-Level History

Component 1:Breadth study

• written exam: 2 hours 30

minutes

• three questions

(one compulsory)

• 80 marks

•• 40% of A-level

Questions

• two sections

• Section A – one

compulsory question

linked to historical

interpretations (30 marks)

• Section B – two from three essays (2 x 25 marks)

AQA A-Level History

Component 2: Depth study

• written exam: 2 hours 30

minutes

• three questions

(one compulsory)

• 80 marks

• 40% of A-level

Questions

• two sections

• Section A – one

compulsory question

linked to primary sources

or sources contemporary

to the period (30 marks)

• Section B – two from three

essays (2 x 25 marks)

 

Historical investigation

What's assessed

A personal study based on a topic of student's choice.

This should take the form of a question in the context of approximately 100 years.

• 3,000 – 3,500 words

• 40 marks

• 20% of A-level

• marked by teachers

• moderated by AQA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ENRICHMENT OPPORTUNITIES AT KEYSTAGE 5

  • Lessons from Auschwitz project
  • Visit to the imperial war museum
  • Visit to the museum in the Docklands
  • Master class sessions at SOAS
  • Guest speakers
 

Please contact us at - History@central.towerhamlets.sch.uk

WHO’S IN THE TEAM?

Please contact us at - HumanitiesDept@central.towerhamlets.sch.uk 

Ms. C. Burgess, Head of Humanities Faculty

Ms. O. Cornwell, Teacher of History

Ms. A. Ito, Teacher of History

Ms. M. Ahmed-Ali,  Head of PSHE/Teacher of History

Ms. M. Ahmed, Senior  Lead  Practitioner/Teacher of History