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Religious Studies

The Religious  Studies department at CFGS are committed to ensuring that RE is challenging, inspiring and engaging. We want CFGS students to develop their levels of religious literacy, conceptual understanding and be able to articulate with their ideas about religion, beliefs and spirituality. They should learn to articulate clearly and coherently their personal beliefs, ideas, values and experiences while respecting the rights of others to differ.  Our curriculum will enable our students to become confident learners and ask questions about beliefs and practices and challenge different viewpoints.  We want our students to reflect on their own beliefs and be able to explain why they have these. We promote British values in RE lessons by providing opportunities for our students to study different opinions and beliefs with an open-mind, this will promote social cohesion and integration. Within RE lessons students practise Central Essentials through respecting beliefs and opinions that are different to their own. Studying RE at CFGS enables our students to be thoughtful members of a diverse, modern and plural society. It will raise questions of spirituality, identity and question morality. 

 

KEYSTAGE 3

KS3 Summary of knowledge and content covered across KS3, showing how learning is linked to KS2 (where applicable), and how knowledge is deepened over time to prepare students for KS4. You can also include the skills developed.

 

The RE department at CFGS follows the purpose of study set out in the Tower Hamlets Agreed syllabus 2017 – 2022

 

‘Students should expand and deepen their knowledge and understanding of a range of religions and worldviews, recognising their local, national and global context. Building on their prior learning, they learn to appreciate religions and worldviews in systematic ways. They could draw on a wide range of subject specific language confidently and flexibly, learning to use the concepts of religious study to describe the nature of religion. They should understand how beliefs influence the values and lives of individuals and groups and how religions and worldviews have an impact on wider current affairs. They should be able to appraise the practices and beliefs they study with increasing discernment based on analysis, interpretation and evaluation, developing their capacity to articulate well-reasoned positions.’

 

‘The principal aim of RE is to engage pupils in systematic enquiry into significant human questions which religion and worldviews address, so that they can develop the understanding and skills needed to appreciate and appraise varied responses to these questions, as well as develop responses their own.

 

RE teaching and learning should enable pupils to:

 

A: Know about and understand a range of religions and worldviews

 

B: Express Ideas and insights about the nature, significance and impact of religions and world views

 

C: Gain and deploy the skills needed to engage seriously with religions and worldviews.

 

At CFGS we cover aspects of all of these areas using a mixture of depth and overview study though interesting and original enquiry questions. We ensure that each Religious Studies skill is taught and tested in each year thus providing progression for students as they work though the KS3 curriculum. We have linked our assessment objectives and marking schemes to the GCSE AQA course that we teach at KS4 to ensure that they are prepared for the GCSE.  KS4.

 

The skills we assess at KS3 are:

• AO1: Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of religion and beliefs including: beliefs and practices

• A01: Similarities and differences within and/or between religions and beliefs

• AO2: Analyse and evaluate aspects of religion and belief, including their significance and influence.

 

TERM & THEME

                                                   Year 7 

Autumn Term 

Why are festivals important to religious communities?

Opportunities to explore religious festivals from the main 6 religions

  • Describe how religious people celebrate their festivals
  • Explain why they celebrate these festivals 
  • Evaluate the festival, assessing what the strengths and weaknesses are

Assessment

Timed 40 minute exam paper assessing students’ ability to demonstrate the describing, explaining, evaluating and interpreting.

Spring Term 

What does it mean to be a Sikh today?

Opportunities to explore Sikhism.

  • Explain the beliefs and practices of Sikhism.
  • Explain the impact these beliefs and practices has on Sikhs around the world and the community
  • Evaluate these beliefs and practices to others faiths

 

 Assessment

Timed 40 minute exam paper assessing students’ ability to demonstrate the describing, explaining, evaluating and interpreting.

Summer Term

Why are Religious leaders important to communities?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Should happiness be the purpose of life?

Opportunities to explore key religious figures that have made an impact on society and religion.

Students will focus on the following figures:

  • Martin Luther King
  • Rosa Parks
  • Dalia Lama
  • Desmond Tutu
  • Malcom X

•Explain the lives of the religious leaders

•Explain why they are important to communities   

•Evaluate whether they have made a positive/negative impact on society

Assessment

Timed exam questions assessing students’ ability to demonstrate the describing, explaining, evaluating and interpreting.

 

 

Opportunities to explore the concepts of happiness from religious and non-religious views

  • Students can explain a Christian, Buddhist, humanist and other views of how to achieve happiness
  • Explain the impact these views on happiness have on these people
  • Evaluate these views by assessing  the strengths and weaknesses

 

Assessment

Students have to a create presentation on the different interpretations of happiness

 

TERM & TIME Year 8

Autumn Term 

How important are Religious themes to communities?

Students explore common religious themes from the main 6 religions

•Explain religious stories from the Holy books

• Explain the moral of the theme from the story and how this can benefit the community

•Evaluate the theme, assessing the strengths and weaknesses of it

Assessment

Timed 40 minute exam paper assessing students’ ability to demonstrate the describing, explaining, evaluating and interpreting.

Spring Term

What does it mean to be a Buddhist today?

Opportunities to explore Buddhism.

  • Explain the beliefs and practices of Buddhism.
  • Explain the impact these beliefs and practices has on Buddhist around the world and the community
  • Evaluate these beliefs and practices to others faiths

Assessment

Timed 40 minute exam paper assessing students’ ability to demonstrate the describing, explaining, evaluating and interpreting

Summer Term 

Do we need to prove God’s existence?

 

 

 

 

 

What does it mean to be a Jewish today?

  • Students explore the philosophical reasons for believing in God.
  • They have to support and criticise these views.
  • Students look at reasons for why people do not believe in God and they support and criticise these views.

Assessment

Timed 40 minute exam paper assessing students’ ability to demonstrate the describing, explaining, evaluating and interpreting.

 

Students have the opportunity to explore Judaism.

 

•Explain the beliefs and practices of Judaism

•Explain the impact these beliefs and practices has on Jewish people around the world and the community

•Evaluate these beliefs and practices to others faiths

 

Assessment

Timed 40 minute exam paper assessing students’ ability to demonstrate the describing, explaining, evaluating and interpreting.

 

TERM & TIME Year 9

Autumn Term

Christianity Beliefs

Students will focus on the following topics:

  • The nature of God
  • Problem of evil and suffering
  • Oneness of God and the Trinity
  • Creation Story
  • Resurrection and life after death
  • Jesus Christ and salvation
  •  Incarnation and Jesus as the Son of God
  • Crucifixion, resurrection and ascension
  • Sin, including original sin
  • Salvation
  • Atonement.

Spring Term 

Christianity Practices

Students will focus on the following topics:

• Different forms of worship and their significance

  • Prayer and its significance, including the Lord’s Prayer, set prayers and informal prayer
  • Sacraments
  • Infant and believers' baptism
  • Holy Communion/Eucharist
  • Pilgrimage
  • Christmas and Easter
  • The role of the Church in the local community, including food banks and street pastors. • The place of mission, evangelism and Church growth
  • Reconciliation
  • Persecution

Summer Term 

Islam Beliefs

Students will focus on the following topics:

• The six articles of faith in Sunni Islam

  • Usul ad-Din in Shi’a Islam
  • Tawhid (the Oneness of God), Qur’an Surah 112
  • The nature of God
  • Angels, their nature and role
  • Predestination and human freedom and its relationship to the Day of Judgement
  • Akhirah (life after death
  • Risalah (Prophethood)
  • The holy books
  • The imamate in Shi'a Islam: its role and significance.

ENRICHMENT OPPORTUNITIES AT KEYSTAGE 3 

The department offers trips to the Christian Baptist Church to take part in activities on Easter and Christmas.  

Students have opportunities to celebrate the positive side of Gandhi, he visited this borough and there is a portrait of him is at Parent Reception

Students have opportunities to make PowerPoint presentations about the famous people who stood up for their faith despite the challenges they faced Martin Luther King, Malcom X and Desmond Tutu, they can deliver assemblies to other year groups teaching them about famous religious leaders. 

KEYSTAGE 4

KS4 Summary of knowledge and content covered across KS4, showing how learning is built on from KS3 and deepened over time to prepare students for their exams and post-16 study. You can also include the skills developed.

Students study religious, philosophical and ethical arguments related to the issues raised, and their impact and influence on the modern world. Students will be expected to show their understanding of religion through the application of teachings from religion and beliefs. They will also be expected to make specific references to sources of wisdom and authority including scripture and/or sacred texts. They may refer to any relevant religious text such as sermons of the Buddha, the Bible, the Catechism of the Catholic Church, the Vedas and Upanishads, the Qur’an and Hadith, the Torah and Talmud, and the Guru Granth Sahib.

Students must demonstrate knowledge and understanding that the religious tradition of Great Britain is Christianity. Students learn the four ethical topics:

  1. Religious attitudes towards relationships
  2. Religious attitudes towards crime and punishment
  3. Religious attitudes towards peace and conflict
  4. Religion attitudes towards life

From these topics they may draw upon Christianity, Buddhism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism and Sikhism, as well as other religions and non-religious beliefs such as atheism and humanism.

In addition, students study the beliefs, teachings and practices of Christianity and Islam and their basis of wisdom and authority. They learn to refer to scripture and/or sacred texts where appropriate. Students should study the influence of the beliefs, teachings and practices studied on individuals, communities and societies. Common and divergent views within Islam and Christianity in the way beliefs and teachings are understood and expressed should be included throughout. Students may refer to a range of different Christian and Islamic perspectives in their answers including Catholic, Orthodox and Protestant, Shia and Sunni.

 

TERM & THEMES                                          Year 10 

Autumn Term 

Islam Practices

 

Students will focus on the following topics:

• Five Pillars of Sunni Islam and the Ten Obligatory Acts of Shi’a Islam

  • Shahadah: declaration of faith and its place in Muslim practice
  • Salah and its significance
  • Sawm: the role and significance of fasting

• Zakah: the role and significance of giving alms

  • Hajj: the role and significance of the pilgrimage to Makkah
  • Jihad: different understandings of jihad: the meaning and significance of greater and lesser jihad

Festivals including Id-ul-Adha, Id-ul-Fitr, Ashura

Spring Term

Religious attitudes towards life 

 

Students will focus on the following topics:

• Abortion.

• Euthanasia.

• Animal experimentation.

origins of the universe, and different interpretations of these

• The relationship between scientific views, such as the Big Bang theory, and religious views.

• The value of the world and stewardship, dominion, responsibility, awe and wonder.

• The use and abuse of the environment, • The use and abuse of animals, including:

• animal experimentation

• The use of animals for food.

The origins and value of human life

• The relationship between scientific views, such as evolution, and religious views.

• The concepts of sanctity of life and the quality of life.

• Abortion

  • Ethical arguments related to abortion
  • Euthanasia.

•Beliefs about death and an afterlife, and their impact on beliefs about the value of human life.

 

They must be able to explain contrasting beliefs on the following three issues with reference to the

main religious tradition in Britain (Christianity) and one or more other religious traditions

Summer Term 

Religious attitudes towards Crime and punishment

Students will focus on the following topics:

• Corporal punishment.

• Death penalty.

• Forgiveness.

  • Religion, crime and the causes of crime

• Good and evil intentions and actions, including whether it can ever be good to cause suffering.

• Reasons for crime

• Views about people who break the law for these reasons.

• Views about different types of crime, including hate crimes, theft and murder.

• The aims of punishment

• The treatment of criminals

• Forgiveness.

• The death penalty.

• Ethical arguments related to the death penalty, including those based on the principle of utility and sanctity of life.

They must be able to explain contrasting beliefs on the following three issues with reference to the

main religious tradition in Britain (Christianity) and one or more other religious traditions

 

TERM & THEME                                           Year 11

Autumn Term 

Religious attitudes towards peace and conflict

Students will focus on the following topics:

• Violence.

• Weapons of mass destruction.

• Pacifism.

• The meaning and significance of: peace, justice, forgiveness, reconciliation.

• Violence, including violent protest.

• Terrorism.

• Reasons for war, including greed, self-defence and retaliation.

• The just war theory, including the criteria for a just war.

• Holy war.

• Pacifism.

• Religion and belief as a cause of war and violence in the contemporary world.

• Nuclear weapons, including nuclear deterrence.

• The use of weapons of mass destruction.

• Religion and peace-making in the contemporary world including the work of individuals influenced by religious teaching.

• Religious responses to the victims of war including the work of one present day religious organisation.

They must be able to explain contrasting beliefs on the following three issues with reference to the

main religious tradition in Britain (Christianity) and one or more other religious traditions

Spring Term 

Religion and Relationships

Students will focus on the following topics:

• Human sexuality including: heterosexual and homosexual relationships.

• Sexual relationships before and outside of marriage.

• Contraception and family planning.

• The nature and purpose of marriage.

• Same-sex marriage and cohabitation.

• Divorce, including reasons for divorce, and remarrying.

• Ethical arguments related to divorce, including those based on the sanctity of marriage vows and compassion.

• The nature of families

• The purpose of families, including: procreation, stability and the protection of children, educating children in a faith.

• Contemporary family issues including: same-sex parents, polygamy.

• The roles of men and women.

• Gender equality.

• Gender prejudice and discrimination, including examples.

 

They must be able to explain contrasting beliefs on the following three issues with reference to the

main religious tradition in Britain (Christianity) and one or more other religious traditions

Summer Term 

Revision

Students will be revising topics from the two papers they will sitting:

1. Religious beliefs teachings and practices

2. Religious Themes

ENRICHMENT OPPORTUNITIES AT KEYSTAGE 4 

Students have opportunities to make a PowerPoint presentation about the famous people who stood up for their faith such as Desmond Tutu, The Dalia Lama and Dietrich Bonhoeffer. Students are given the opportunities to deliver assemblies to other year groups teaching them about religious festivals. Students are able to teach lessons to other students within the class.

 

EXAM BOARD AND WEIGHTINGS (include NEA details if applicable)

  • GCSE AQA Religious Studies
  • Specification code: 8062
  • Religious beliefs and practices: Christianity and Islam – Paper 1: 1hour 45 mins
  • Religious themes: Paper 1: 1 hour 45 mins

 

USEFUL WEBSITES , RESOURCES, REVISION MATERIALS AND EXEMPLAR WORK 

Student exam specifications - BBC Bitesize

Students use these textbooks in lessons

Students have the opportunity to purchase these books from Student Reception

KEYSTAGE 5

The KS5 course is a study of Christianity Philosophy and Ethics. This course ensures students have a thorough understanding of diverse philosophical and ethical viewpoints. Students gain critical and evaluative skills sought by higher education and employers – particularly in law, education, social work, politics, medicine, administration and the media.

Religious studies is a thought provoking subject and our contemporary themes, the aims of A-Level  are for students to:

• reflect on, select and apply specified knowledge

• construct well informed and reasoned arguments substantiated by relevant evidence

• understand, interpret and evaluate critically religious concepts, texts and other sources

• present responses to questions which are clear and coherent

• use specialist language and terminology appropriately

• identify, investigate and critically analyse questions, arguments, ideas and issues arising from the chosen approaches

• engage in debate in a way that recognises the right of others to hold a different view

• critically analyse and evaluate the views and arguments of scholars/academics

• account for the influence of social, religious and historical factors on developments in the study of religions and beliefs

• analyse the nature of connections between the various elements of their course of study

• develop breadth and depth in their understanding of the connections between the knowledge, understanding and skills set out in the specification as a whole.

• develop their interest in a rigorous study of religion and belief and relate it to the wider world

• develop knowledge and understanding appropriate to a specialist study of religion

• develop an understanding and appreciation of religious thought and its contribution to individuals, communities and societies

• adopt an enquiring, critical and reflective approach to the study of religion

• reflect on and develop their own values, opinions and attitudes in light of their study.

 

TERM & THEMES                                         YEAR 12

Autumn Term 

Philosophy: Does God exist?

 

Philosophy: Beliefs on God

Ethics and religion

Natural Moral law Aquinas

 

Ethics and religion

Virtue Ethics

Spring Term 

Philosophy: Evil and suffering

 

Philosophy: Religious experience

 

Ethics and religion

Situation ethics

 

Christianity

Sources of wisdom and authority

Summer Term 

Philosophy:  Self, death and the afterlife

 

Philosophy:

Expressions of religious identity

 

Christianity

Good conduct and key moral principles

 

Ethics and religion

Introduction to meta-ethics

 

TERM & THEME                                             Year 13 

Autumn Term 

Philosophy: Self, death and the afterlife

 

 

Philosophy: Religious language

 

Ethics and religion

Free will and moral responsibility

 

 

Ethics and religion

Conscience

Bentham and Kant

Spring Term 

Philosophy: Miracles Christianity and science

 

 

 

Christianity and the challenge of secularisation

 

Christianity, gender and sexuality Christianity

The Dialogue between Christianity and ethics

Summer Term 

Christianity

Christianity, migration and religious pluralism Christianity

The Dialogue between Christianity and ethics

Exams

 

ENRICHMENT OPPORTUNITIES AT KEYSTAGE 5

Students have the opportunities to be Ambassadors of Faith and Belief, here they are part of a programme where they visit primary schools and deliver lessons on their own faith or a passion or interest.  Students have opportunities to learn specific topics within the A level content and plan a lesson to deliver to students.  Students have the opportunity to participate in Socratic talk during lessons.

EXAM BOARD AND WEIGHTINGS (include NEA details if applicable)

A level Religious Studies: Specification code: 7062

3.1 Component 1: Philosophy of religion and ethics

3.2 Component 2: Study of religion and dialogues

 

USEFUL WEBSITES, RESOURCES, REVISION MATERIALS AND EXEMPLAR WORK 

AQA AS and A Level Religious Studies 

Tutur2u - Religious Studies

WHO’S IN THE TEAM?

Faculty email:  Redept@central.towerhamlets.sch.uk

Ms. L. Armstrong, Head of RE

Ms. S. St.Luce, Teacher of RE/Head of Year 8 

Ms. S. Quinn, Teacher of RE /KS5 Co-ordinator

Ms. R. Mohamed, Teacher of RE

Ms. A Khanom, Teacher of RE